fyi [links, jan 2017]

Some more or less recent stuff, focussed on GIFs. Or other web animations. Or something else loosely connected to that.

It has become quiet around here and I apologise for that. But during the last weeks we really didn’t have many GIF news, so this time there is only a short link list:

As announced on this blog, there was a GIF conference in Bologna in the end of November. You can find video recordings of some of the presentations on this site. I hope to find the time to write reviews for some talks that are not available as recordings.

Peeqo is a personal desktop robotic assistant who expresses himself through GIFs.“ There is also a gallery that documents the engineering process. [Thanks to Timo for the link]

The Democratic Party Needs to Stop Using Reaction Gifs“ – A short comment that focusses on meme use by the US democrats, but can actually be seen as a more general advice for any large institution or company: Garnishing their posts on social media with GIFs isn’t necessarily a good idea, just because it’s trendy or all the other users are doing it.

This paper introduces a novel approach for generating GIFs called Synchronized Deep Recurrent Attentive Writer (Sync-DRAW).“

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fyi [links, nov 2016]

Some more or less recent stuff, focussed on GIFs. Or other web animations. Or something else loosely connected to that.

There will be a conference about “The New Imageries of GIF Culture”, 24 – 25 November 2016 in Bologna. I know this is on very short notice, but I also just read about it a week or so ago. Luckily, the organisers will provide live streaming of the presentations. If you can’t get enough of GIF research, check out their bibliography.

GIFilter“ is a university project that analysed the main GIF design paradigms and presents the outcome with a poster series.

As neural networks lately are applied to, well, everything, it was only a matter of time until someone develops a GIF search engine on the basis of deep learning and here it is: DeepGIF.

Tom Moody comments on a GIF animation history article and points out a crucial point about Giphy that I can very much relate to:
”Once GIFs have a reliable central location where they can be created, stored, and tweaked, people will stop saving them to their individual devices. Then, the GIF as a free-floating entity will finally shrivel up and die — there will only be Giphy.“

Vine is shutting down. Here we see what could happen to any proprietary piece of software – no matter how popular or important for web culture, it can be discontinued at any time. GIFs however, are not bound to a certain service (yet – despite all the effort Giphy is putting into its GIF domination;) so their fortune mainly depends on the users themselves.

And finally here are three academic papers about GIFs, the latter two of which I haven’t had the time to read entirely yet. But I’m sure that you are able to comprehend them yourselves:)

Gürsimsek, Ödül Akyapi (2016): ”Animated GIFs as vernacular graphic design: producing Tumblr blogs
The author focusses on GIFs related to the series ”Lost“ and how they are appropriated by Tumblr users. She draws some interesting conclusions, including a handy definition of GIF literacy: “GIF literacy is the ability to remediate televisual performance into social cues to be used in vernacular digital communication. This is coupled with the literacy of using image editing software.” (p.347)

Chiarini, Alessandra (2016): ”The Multiplicity of the Loop: The Dialectics of Stillness and Movement in the Cinemagraph

Gygli, Michael; Soleymani, Mohammad (2016): ”Analyzing and Predicting GIF Interestingness